Roadrunner Haiku Journal
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February 2009  Issue IX:1

Gendai [21st Century-Modern] Haiku Translations

by Hiroaki Sato

 

Fujiki Kiyoko (dates unknown)

 

Fujiki started publishing haiku in 1933. She became a prominent figure in the Shinkō (New Rising) haiku movement, and disappeared in 1940 when its leaders were arrested for advocating liberalism and “anti-traditionalism.” Practically nothing else is known about her.

One feature of Shinkō haiku poets was a rejection of seasonal elements, but Fujiki often employed them. The haiku selected here were all published in the magazine Kikan   (Flagship), which played a leading role in the Shinkō movement.

 

 

In an old bed a devil grabbed me by my black hair

 

 

Pity the stokers at the ship's bottom summer has begun

 

 

Early autumn's good ocher-colored my limbs my body

 

 

            Insomnia

 

In winter rains I'm listening to a nurse's tale

 

 

            An Oppressed Wife’s Memo

 

Lonely spring a wife lives as if she were machinery

 

 

The quiet sound of a falling mosquito resounds in my body

 

 

Through my temples a locomotive dashes dark

 

 

            A parting

 

Trees budding officers and men quietly return

 

 

Fingerprints of desolation everywhere clouds white

 

 

On the tatami of August a woman has grown fat

 

 

Katydids my perspective gradually narrows

 

 

In a monks' quarter I swallow down painful love

 

 

I wouldn't want war and women to be separate

 

 

Boy going to war reticent the sukiyaki singeing cooks down

 

 

Killed in battle all his thirty-two teeth untouched

 

 

Under a clear sky healed I smell my own loneliness

 

 

Having gotten used to the depth of war I love a dog

 

 

Not being the widow of someone killed in battle loneliness

 

 

Friend's husband in a distant battlefield the sea glistens

 

 

I turn off the lights and enjoy the solitude of solitude

 

 

Having lived single-mindedly I’ve lost my goal

 

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